Book Discussion: "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neale Hurston

Date: 
Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 6:30pm - 7:45pm
Contact: 
Contact: Help Desk @ 986-1047, ext. 3 or warref@rcls.org
Age Group: 
Adult

At the height of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She was a sometime-collaborator with Langston Hughes and a fierce rival of Richard Wright. Her stories appeared in major magazines, she consulted on Hollywood screenplays, and she penned four novels, an autobiography, countless essays, and two books on black mythology. Yet by the late 1950s, Hurston was living in obscurity, working as a maid in a Florida hotel. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work.  Of Hurston’s fiction, Their Eyes Were Watching God is arguably the best-known and perhaps the most controversial. [-Amazon.com Review]

"Their Eyes Were Watching God belongs in the same category with [the works of] William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway, that of enduring American literature.”  [Saturday Review]

Copies of the book are available at the Library.

Room set-up
Room: 
[ Registration Required ]
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